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Monthly Archives: September 2017

Create your perfect progressive dairy internship

Do you have a passion for the dairy industry? As an intern, do you want to learn from, work with and help progressive dairy producers? If so, we want to work with you!

Choose from one, or any combination, of the following focus areas to design your customized and rewarding internship – with your skills and career goals in mind.

Genetic Consulting

Travel within a multi-state region to large, progressive partner dairies or work with source herds for Alta’s product development and PEAK programs. Implement customized genetic plans, assist with sire procurement, provide performance reports using DairyComp, assist with Holstein Association SET evaluations and select and prepare daughters for professional photography.

Reproductive Management

Develop your understanding of advanced herd reproductive strategies with thorough hands-on experience. Assist with pregnancy diagnosis, artificial insemination, tail striping, heat detection and monitoring herd reproductive performance using DairyComp in herds averaging 2,000 cows.

Sales

Work with our current network of sales managers to build your own portfolio of accounts. Provide genetic, reproductive and calf management consulting advice, and develop customized solutions for current and prospect progressive dairy farms.

Marketing & Training

Enhance your skills in all areas of marketing, communications and training by promoting the Koepon companies globally through online, print and video communication pieces.

Calf Management

Work with the SCCL team on new research projects to advance the health and productivity of neonatal calves. Or use your sales and marketing skills to promote SCCL products through trade show involvement and producer and vet meetings.

Dairy Herd Management Software

Develop your understanding on current VAS products and software including DairyComp, FeedComp, ParlorComp, and more. Increase your knowledge, awareness and efficiency with dairy herd management software and practical application in every day, on-farm use.

As sister companies within Koepon Holding, we join forces with PEAK Genetics, SCCL and VAS to focus on supporting modern, progressive dairy farmers worldwide and providing them the knowledge they need to improve their dairy herd management practices now, and into the future.

 

APPLY TODAY FOR INTERNSHIPS WITH ALTA, VAS, SCCL AND PEAK.
Please apply online HERE by Friday, November 10.

Image of Emma Brenengen, 2017 Alta Reproductive Management Intern
“My internship with Alta Genetics is easily one of the best experiences I have had. Not only did I get the practice and repetition breeding cows, I was able to work with synch programs, use DairyComp, and analyze reproductive performance of different farms throughout the summer. I really was able to gain experience with all aspects of a successful reproductive program on a dairy farm and I feel like this internship has more than prepared me to begin a career in this industry!”

Emma Brenengen, Penn State University
Alta Reproductive Services Intern

Image of Jennifer Callanan, Washington State University; Previous VAS Intern and Current VAS Software Support Specialist
“My internship with VAS provided me with the unique opportunity to be a part of a team whose main focus is to move dairies forward in efficiency and consistency. From hands-on involvement with the development of new technologies and tools, to insightful training with the existing programs, this internship offers a great view into the future of dairy and progressive thinking. I am excited to continue working for such a diverse company and support the success of the dairy industry.”

Jennifer Callanan, Washington State University
Previous VAS Intern and Current VAS Software Support Specialist

Image of Adam Vander Dussen, 2017 Alta Sales Intern
“The people who work at Alta are the main draw for me. When there is work to be done, it gets done, but of course, with a little fun. Another thing that is a huge draw is that Alta chooses its clients. Progressive dairies are the future of the industry and Alta is headed towards the future. It is a great company and I am extremely excited for the opportunities ahead.”

Adam Vander Dussen, New Mexico State University
Alta Sales Intern

Image of Taylor Leach, New marketing Intern for Alta Genetics
“I enjoyed being able to create value for the marketing team by adding new creativity to some of the materials they publish online. The team has been very supportive by giving me the freedom to come up with some of my own ideas which was a rewarding learning experience. I was also able to explore larger dairy facilities and learn how they tailor their operation to work more efficiently. I saw myself reach new goals which I did not foresee myself accomplishing so quickly.”

Taylor Leach, Oklahoma State University
Alta Marketing & Communications Intern

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Genetics and A2 milk: what you need to know

As consumers continuously look for new ways to eat healthy, A2 milk is a trend that emerges on their radar. A2 milk has been a common brand in Australia and New Zealand for several years. It only made its entry to the US marketplace in 2015.

It’s a new concept for many people, so before you join in on the A2 hype, here are a few answers to questions you may have.

What is A2 milk?

A2 milk is produced only from cows having two copies of the A2 gene for beta casein.

To explain further, cows’ milk is about 87 percent water. The remaining 13 percent is a combination of lactose, fat, protein, and minerals that make up the solids in milk.

If we focus on the protein within milk, the major component of that protein is called casein. About 30% of the casein within milk is called beta casein. The two most common variants of the beta casein gene are A1 and A2, so any given bovine will be either A1A1, A1A2 or A2A2 for beta casein.

In the United States nearly 100% of the milk contains a combination of both A1 and A2 beta casein.

What is the benefit of A2 milk?

Researchers believe that A2 is the more natural variant of beta casein, and A1 was the result of a natural genetic mutation that occurred when cattle were first domesticated. With that in mind, studies have been done to see if people digest or react to true A2 milk differently than regular milk.

Some of those studies have found that people drinking milk exclusively from cows producing A2 milk were less susceptible to bloating and indigestion – leading some to conclude that A2 milk is a healthier option than regular milk. The exact science behind the difference in A1 versus A2 milk is complicated, but research has shown that digestive enzymes interact with A1 and A2 beta-casein proteins in different ways. Because of that, A1 and A2 milk are processed differently within the body.

Can you breed for A2 milk?

Yes, in fact the only way to have cows that produce A2 milk is to breed for it.

True A2 milk can only be produced from cattle possessing two copies of the A2 gene in their DNA. Each animal receives one copy of the gene from its sire and one copy from its dam. So for a chance to get an animal with the A2A2 makeup, you must breed a bull with at least one copy of the A2 allele to a cow with at least one copy of the A2 allele.

To ensure with 100% certainty that a female will produce A2 milk once she freshens, she must be the result of mating a cow with two copies of the A2 gene to a sire that also has two copies of the A2 gene.

Does A2 milk only come from colored breeds of dairy cattle?

Traditionally, colored breeds of dairy cattle, such as Jerseys and Guernseys have been the poster children for the A2 gene. Those two breeds still have a higher proportion of A2A2 animals. However, some of the popular Holstein sires of recent years have increased the prevalence of A2A2 sires in the black and white breed as well.

You may be surprised that about 40% of the Holstein sires in active AI lineups, including numerous household names, have two copies of the A2 gene. In addition, over 80% of Holstein sires have at least one copy of the A2 gene.

Is A2 milk the answer for people with lactose intolerance?

A2 milk contains the same amount of lactose as non-A2 milk. So in clinically-diagnosed cases of lactose intolerance, A2 milk will not provide the benefits that lactose-free milk would offer.

Since most cases of lactose intolerance are self-diagnosed, some doctors believe the cause of indigestion in those cases is actually linked to an A1 aversion rather than lactose intolerance. In those cases, drinking A2 milk may help prevent the side-effects otherwise experienced from drinking regular milk.

Should you select for A2 in your breeding program?

With this new information at hand, it may seem compelling to produce only true A2 milk. Many A2A2 sires are available, but you still have an opportunity cost by selecting only A2A2 sires.

When A2A2 is a limiting factor in your genetic selection, you’ll eliminate about half of all bulls available. That means you will likely miss out on pounds of milk, extra health and improved fertility traits.

Regardless of your selection decision around A2 sires, make sure it aligns with the customized genetic plan you put in place on your farm so you can maximize profitability and genetic progress in the direction of your goals.

 

Click HERE to view a list of Alta’s current A2A2 sires.

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