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Monthly Archives: August 2018

Alta staff honored for their AI industry service

Alta’s US honorees who were able to celebrate their AI industry tenure with a celebration in Watertown!

Front row (L to R): Scott Kooiman, Mel Blasing, Bill Beckman, Darren Peterson
Second row: Cindy Scherer, Donna Ludeman, Diane Haseleu, David Hill
Back row: Lori Loma, Terry DeBlare, Shelley Hazlett-Gooch, Paul Hunt, and the late Timothy Wendorf

Within the US, the National Association of Animal Breeders (NAAB) has recognized individuals for their AI industry tenure since 1965. Previously, honorees were recognized for their years of service after a quarter century and later after a half century. An updated award process this year means NAAB now offers recognition for 20 years, 30 years, 40 years and 50 years of AI industry service.

At Alta, we have a wonderful, committed team! To celebrate the NAAB recognition of these deserving staff, a celebratory lunch was held at the Watertown office on August 10.

The entire list of US Alta staff, who we celebrate for their tremendous, committed AI industry tenure include:

30 years

  • Bruce Arnold, Premier Account Team Leader (34 years)
  • Brian Stahl, Elite Account Manager in the Mountain West Team (34 years)
  • Fred Tidemann, District Sales Manager in the North Central Team (34 years)
  • Tim Benda, Elite Account Manager in the Northeast Team (31 years)
  • Cheri Miller, Export Coordinator (30 years)
  • Cindy Scherer, Lab Technician (30 years)

20 years

  • Roger Sosa, Sr. International Sales Manager, Beef (28 years)
  • Mike Menendez, Regional Sire Analyst (27 years)
  • Jim Powers, Elite Account Manager in the North Central Team (26 years)
  • Jon Stanley, Atlantic Team Leader (26 years)
  • Bob Welper, Director of Global Product Development (26 years)
  • Donna Ludeman, Watertown Lab Manager (26 years)
  • The late Timothy Wendorf, Watertown Herdsperson (26 years)
  • Bill Beckman, Production Supervisor (25 years)
  • Dave Schroepfer, Elite Account Manager in the North Central Team (24 years)
  • Tim Shoen, District Sales Manager in the Northeast Team (23 years)
  • Diane Haseleu, Watertown Administrative Assistant (23 years)
  • Lori Loma, Distribution and Shipping (23 years)
  • Mel Blasing, Distribution and Shipping (23 years)
  • Paul Hunt, COO (23 years)
  • Steve Yurgel, District Sales Manager in the Northeast Team (22 years)
  • Terry DeBlare, Export Coordinator (22 years)
  • David Hill, US Alta Advantage Specialist (21 years)
  • Scott Kooiman, Watertown Herdsperson (21 years)
  • Darren Peterson, Former team leader (20 years)
  • Shelley Hazlett-Gooch, AltaTWO Program Manager & Global Support (20 years)

Thank you and congratulations to our Alta team for their service!

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Haplotypes vs. genetic mutations

With August proofs, we saw a new and unique situation with two Alta sires: newly released sexed-only 11HO12240 AltaMILESTONE and G-STAR sire, 11HO11740 AltaFACET.

AltaMILESTONE’s initial genomic test told us he was free from the HH5 haplotype. However, the more extensive gene test for the causative mutation told us he is, in fact, an HH5-carrier. Similarly, AltaFACET was initially coded as free from the HH3 haplotype, but a later gene test revealed he is an HH3-carrier.

Traditionally, haplotypes are identified when animals have the same extended sequence of about 100 SNPs. Because we know there is more to this than the currently identified haplotypes, researchers are working to identify the exact causative mutations that cause early embryonic death1,2. This causative mutation is located in between two of the 100 SNPs used in the haplotype identification, but prior to finding the true causative mutation the exact location was unknown.

Over time, crossover events that occur in the DNA during sperm and egg creation can breakup and reassemble parts of an animal’s genome. That’s why we often see so much diversity in the progeny from a single mating pair.

These crossover events can also breakup that sequence of the 100 SNPs that we traditionally use to identify the haplotypes. If this happens, an animal could still have the causative mutation, but only have 40 of the 100 SNPs that would identify them as a haplotype carrier.

As researchers continue to identify the causative mutations for negative haplotypes, the specific gene tests will eventually replace the current haplotype tests used by the CDCB.

Although crossover events frequently happen in gamete formation, this process rarely occurs within the lethal haplotypes. In fact, these are the first instances of inconsistent haplotype results for Alta marketed sires.

For full disclosure, it’s important to remember that AltaMILESTONE (HH5) and AltaFACET (HH3) both have the causative mutation for their respective haplotypes and will therefore be labeled as carriers on Alta’s proof materials and website.

 

1Shutz et al. 2016. The Holstein Friesian Lethal Haplotype 5 (HH5) Results from a Complete Deletion of TBF1M and Cholesterol Deficiency (CDH) from an ERV-(LTR) Insertion into the Coding Region of APOB. PLoS ONE 11:e0154602.

2McClure et al. 2014. Bovine Exome Sequence Analysis and Targeted SNP Genotyping of Recessive Fertility Defects BH1, HH2, and HH3 Reveal a Putative Causative Mutation in SMC2 for HH3. PLoS One 9(3):e92769.

 

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